Daylilies
Nasrene MacDonald - Port Charlotte, FL
Here are three of my floral applique circular panels for your Artist Gallery: "Poppies," "Coneflower," and "Daylilies." These works incorporate shaped art glass pieces (including much from scrap!) glued to a clear glass backing (we use Weldbond), with tile grout in the seams. My own art training, at the Chelsea School of Art in London, was as a painter (oils and pastels). I find that the applique method lends itself to a painterly or impressionistic effect that can't be achieved with copperfoil constructions. In particular, tiny pieces and very narrow points are not obliterated by overlapping foil, and the art glass pieces can often be so closely appressed as to make the effect nearly "seamless." The applique method is much more "free and easy" than copperfoil for nature subjects -- and it's fun! 

147
Coneflower
Nasrene MacDonald - Port Charlotte, FL
Here are three of my floral applique circular panels for your Artist Gallery: "Poppies," "Coneflower," and "Daylilies." These works incorporate shaped art glass pieces (including much from scrap!) glued to a clear glass backing (we use Weldbond), with tile grout in the seams. My own art training, at the Chelsea School of Art in London, was as a painter (oils and pastels). I find that the applique method lends itself to a painterly or impressionistic effect that can't be achieved with copperfoil constructions. In particular, tiny pieces and very narrow points are not obliterated by overlapping foil, and the art glass pieces can often be so closely appressed as to make the effect nearly "seamless." The applique method is much more "free and easy" than copperfoil for nature subjects -- and it's fun! 

146
Poppies
Nasrene MacDonald - Port Charlotte, FL
Here are three of my floral applique circular panels for your Artist Gallery: "Poppies," "Coneflower," and "Daylilies." These works incorporate shaped art glass pieces (including much from scrap!) glued to a clear glass backing (we use Weldbond), with tile grout in the seams. My own art training, at the Chelsea School of Art in London, was as a painter (oils and pastels). I find that the applique method lends itself to a painterly or impressionistic effect that can't be achieved with copper foil constructions. In particular, tiny pieces and very narrow points are not obliterated by overlapping foil, and the art glass pieces can often be so closely appressed as to make the effect nearly "seamless." The applique method is much more "free and easy" than copperfoil for nature subjects -- and it's fun! 

145